Carb Sense

Carbohydrates are essential for good health. They give our body energy. But, we must be aware of how carbs effect our body. There are simple and complex carbohydrates. Simple carbs are absorbed quickly into the blood stream, whereas the body has to work at releasing the carbs in their more complex forms. Both enter the blood as glucose. How quickly they raise blood sugar is behind the Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load numbers.
The increase of sugar in the blood stimulates the pancreas to secrete insulin, which is a hormone that the body uses to regulate the blood sugar by informing your body it is time to store the sugar as glycogen and fat. Simple carbs cause a higher sugar load and causes a higher insulin response.
But aren’t their good carbs? Yes. Eat more fresh vegetables, more fresh fruits and less grains and cereals. Vegetables have sugar but it is harder for your body to get to it and causes a gradual absorption into the blood stream. Fruits have more sugar, in the form of fructose, which usually has a higher glycemic load than vegetables. Nature usually pairs these sugars with fiber.
Fiber is not digested by your body, so these carbs basically pass through you. These can be subtracted from the total carbs to get your “net” carbs, also sometimes called impact or effective carbs. If you eat something with a Total Carb count of 16g, with 4g of fiber, then this food would have 12g of net carbs.
You may notice that the fiber and sugar carbs listed on the label do not add up to the total carb count. For instance, a sweet potato, 5” long (130g) has 112 calories. It has 26g of Total Carbohydrate, 4g of fiber and 5g of sugar. So what is the other 17 grams? Those are complex carbohydrates or starches. It has a medium glycemic load of 11. Foods with a glycemic load of 10 or less are considered to have a low glycemic load. High glycemic load (20 and higher) foods increase blood sugar the most.
Keep your net carb count low by using fresh vegetables, supplemented by fruit. Not only do fresh vegetables offer complex carbs, they are usually packed with lots of nutrients. Foods such as raw cauliflower, broccoli, tomato, and even celery are very nutrient dense, make you feel full and accomplish all this with limited calories.
Happy eating. You don’t have to necessarily count carbs, just realize where they come from. Stay away or limit obvious starches as they quickly turn to sugar and increase your insulin (storage hormone) response. Good health to you.

2 responses to “Carb Sense

  1. There is cerainly a great deal to know about this issue.
    I like all of the points you made.

    • Thank you for your comment. There is so much to learn about nutrition. Science is discovering new things all the time. Our bodies are so wonderfully made that we still do not understand the complexities of it all. I love the way that our bodies try to adapt to whatever is thrown at it, It seems that science sometimes identifies the bodies’ coping mechanism for the problem. I know that since I improved my nutrition this year that I am feeling so much better. Good health to you.

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